The convenience store has been making our lives a little easier since 1927, when Southland Ice Company developed what we now call, a convenience store, AKA a c-store. It started off simple, with a man called “Uncle Johnny.” He worked at an ice dock in Texas and began selling milk, bread, and eggs alongside the ice blocks, to help make things a little more convenient for customers who ran out of these items. Most of his business occurred in the evenings and on Sundays when grocery stores were closed. He began selling gas shortly after business started to really take off. The ease of getting ice, gas, and some staple items at one location helped launch the incredible convenience store.

In one decade, over 60 Southland Ice Company retail locations popped up. Customers also appreciated that they could pull up and get curbside service. This allowed them could get whatever they needed without leaving the seat of their car. After the repeal of the prohibition, these “Tote’m” stores became even more popular, as customers could buy liquor and beer, too. In 1946, Southland’s name changed to the ever-famous, 7-Eleven; named for the hours they were open. In the 1950’s, 7-Eleven began spreading across Texas and state lines. Thanks to the National Highway Act of 1956, 7-Eleven and other c-stores grew rapidly. By 1963, there were over 1,000 7-Elevens in the nation!
 
The industry was booming! In 1961, c-store cumulative sales were just under $500 million! Despite the energy crisis, shortage on gas, and food price inflation, more than 20,000 c-stores were operating in 48 states. According to the National Association of Convenience Stores, the rapid and consistent growth of c-stores was thanks to the fact that 34% of the US population lived in the suburbs. More women were working and needed shopping to be fast and easy, and regular grocery stores were growing in size, making them less-convenient when people just needed a few, staple items.
 
Many c-stores that you still see today began and flourished around the same time as 7-Eleven. QuikTrip, an Oklahoma based c-store, opened in 1958. Maverick, a Wyoming based gas station – turned c-store, opened in 1928, the same year Southland Ice Company took off. The difference between Maverick and Southland Ice Company, is that Maverick was a gas station that became a convenience store, while Southland was a convenience store that began selling gas.
 
Fast forward to today, and we can find convenience stores often within a block of each other. The business is still booming! In fact, between 2007 and 2017, more than 10,000 c-stores have opened across the US! There are around 154,535 c-stores operating today. They’ve certainly grown from selling milk, bread, eggs, and ice. With dozens of soda flavors and drink options, ready-made snacks, and other items that we always find ourselves needing in a hurry, customers are almost guaranteed to find exactly what they’re searching for in c-store. In 2014, 19% of all convenience store sales were food related, including ready-made salads, sandwiches, fruit and veggie bowls, and more!
 
So, with this, we tip our hats to the stores that have made all of our road trips a little easier, the stores that have provided us with tasty sandwiches and fresh, hot coffee to get us through a long day, and to the stores that have continued to grow and flourish for the last 90 years.
 
Well done, convenience stores. Well done.

Find out how much money Eruza could save your c-store by contacting us today!
The convenience store has been making our lives a little easier since 1927, when Southland Ice Company developed what we now call, a convenience store, AKA a c-store. It started off simple, with a man called “Uncle Johnny.” He worked at an ice dock in Texas and began selling milk, bread, and eggs alongside the ice blocks, to help make things a little more convenient for customers who ran out of these items. Most of his business occurred in the evenings and on Sundays when grocery stores were closed. He began selling gas shortly after business started to really take off. The ease of getting ice, gas, and some staple items at one location helped launch the incredible convenience store.

In one decade, over 60 Southland Ice Company retail locations popped up. Customers also appreciated that they could pull up and get curbside service. This allowed them could get whatever they needed without leaving the seat of their car. After the repeal of the prohibition, these “Tote’m” stores became even more popular, as customers could buy liquor and beer, too. In 1946, Southland’s name changed to the ever-famous, 7-Eleven; named for the hours they were open. In the 1950’s, 7-Eleven began spreading across Texas and state lines. Thanks to the National Highway Act of 1956, 7-Eleven and other c-stores grew rapidly. By 1963, there were over 1,000 7-Elevens in the nation!
 
The industry was booming! In 1961, c-store cumulative sales were just under $500 million! Despite the energy crisis, shortage on gas, and food price inflation, more than 20,000 c-stores were operating in 48 states. According to the National Association of Convenience Stores, the rapid and consistent growth of c-stores was thanks to the fact that 34% of the US population lived in the suburbs. More women were working and needed shopping to be fast and easy, and regular grocery stores were growing in size, making them less-convenient when people just needed a few, staple items.
 
Many c-stores that you still see today began and flourished around the same time as 7-Eleven. QuikTrip, an Oklahoma based c-store, opened in 1958. Maverick, a Wyoming based gas station – turned c-store, opened in 1928, the same year Southland Ice Company took off. The difference between Maverick and Southland Ice Company, is that Maverick was a gas station that became a convenience store, while Southland was a convenience store that began selling gas.
 
Fast forward to today, and we can find convenience stores often within a block of each other. The business is still booming! In fact, between 2007 and 2017, more than 10,000 c-stores have opened across the US! There are around 154,535 c-stores operating today. They’ve certainly grown from selling milk, bread, eggs, and ice. With dozens of soda flavors and drink options, ready-made snacks, and other items that we always find ourselves needing in a hurry, customers are almost guaranteed to find exactly what they’re searching for in c-store. In 2014, 19% of all convenience store sales were food related, including ready-made salads, sandwiches, fruit and veggie bowls, and more!
 
So, with this, we tip our hats to the stores that have made all of our road trips a little easier, the stores that have provided us with tasty sandwiches and fresh, hot coffee to get us through a long day, and to the stores that have continued to grow and flourish for the last 90 years.
 
Well done, convenience stores. Well done.

Find out how much money Eruza could save your c-store by contacting us today!